1st semester students of Whistling Woods International organize animation exhibition

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Recently, the students of the 1st semester of the Animation Department of Whistling Woods International organised an animation exhibition ‘Glimpse 2017’.

In order to showcase their creation, the students created a diverse of script, storyboard, character designs, background designs, comic book etc.

Few projects were adapted from folk tales from abroad and transformed into an Indian setting. For this, the students chose unique art styles, varied stories and narrative compositions.

A lowdown:

Rudravidhi

Adapted from the famous Greek play ‘Oedipus Rex’, Rudravidhi tracks the story of a man destined to a tragic fate by a horrific prophecy.

The creators of this comic Sanan, Simran and Darshan decided to use the Gond style of art after being inspired by graphic novel Bhimayana by Durgabai Vyam, Subhash Vyam, Srividya Natarajan and S.Anand.

All the three put together some intricately beautiful details and flowing panel orientations, creating a visual spectacle.

Biblical Story

The second exhibit was done with a unique approach by Yohan andb Srijan who came up with the idea of creating an entire comic in 3D using Unity to create their visuals.

The students borrowed the concept from the Biblical story of the Four Horsemen and established it in a Mumbai Mafia setting; showing a feud between two brothers.

The grungy visual style adds to the overall dark and menacing nature of the comic.

Aungsu

Ahona, Hesaka and Heta who presented Aungsu were inspired to take the famous story of Medusa from the Greek Mythology and set it in Nagaland.

They went far enough to create their own etymology to give relevance and credibility for their story adaptation.

The style was digitally expressive, and the narrative, fast-paced and exciting.

In Harness

In Harness was inspired from a Japanese folk tale of the supreme warrior Musoshibo Benkei. Bajro and Sunny Naik adapted Benkei’s story into an Indian setting and made him fight Chagatai Khan, Genghis Khan’ second son. Keeping the original story alive, they went with a realistic but subtle Manga style to illustrate their comic approach.

People interested in the art of animation attended the exhibition in large numbers. Among them was veteran filmmaker Subhash Ghai who showed keen interest in the exhibits and even talked to the animation artists.

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